2011-2012

Did you know that the average college student produces 640 pounds of solid waste each year?[1]

In Fall 2011, there were 7,305 students enrolled at LIU Post.[2]

Assuming that LIU Post students produce just as much trash as the “average” college student, then we would have collectively produced nearly 4.7 million pounds of trash.

Let’s take a look at how much trash we actually did produce during the 2011-2012 school year and see where we stand against that national average.

What Was Recycled?

Weight (in lbs)

Construction Debris*

119,850

Commingled Recyclables

106,880

Scrap Metal

46,654

Electronic Waste

15,554

Batteries

9,899

Ballasts

9,012

Lamps

7,518

Carpet

6,375

Tires

5,820

Mattresses**

3,324

Total Recycled

330,886

*About 50% is recycled.        **About 30% is recycled.

What Was Landfilled?

Weight (in lbs)

Winnick Student Center

350,740

Hillwood Commons

315,640

Construction Debris

119,850

Mattresses

7,756

Rest of Campus***

1,134,848

Total Landfilled

1,928,834

***Based on the results of multiple waste audits

In total, we generated 2.26 million pounds of waste in FY2012. That’s about 309 pounds per student, which is 52% lower than the national average.

Although that may sound very good, there is still much more work to be done at LIU Post. For one thing, we managed to only recycle 15% of our total waste output. That equates to just 45 pounds per person.

In order to continue lowering our impact on the environment, LIU Post is committed to wasting less and recycling more. That is exactly why we have implemented a number of new recycling programs that will hopefully improve upon that recycling rate in the future. However, we can’t do it without you. The best way to improve recycling on campus is for everyone at LIU Post to make a conscious effort to recycle as much as they possibly can.

We hope that you take some time to learn about the many recycling initiatives going on at LIU Post by enjoying this interactive waste snapshot. With your help and support, we should easily increase the amount of recycling that gets done at LIU Post.

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